What up, my knitta?

“But I think what I like the most about Wonderfalls is that it’s a show that comfortably lets its main character be depressed. And not just TV-depressed, crying in bed after a breakup or whatever bullshit. Clinically depressed — isolated, bitter, anhedonic. It’s not catastrophic, severe depression, and Jaye of course experiences moments of reprieve. When things are bleak — depression-wise, or when things are just plain bleak for broad life reasons — sometimes it feels like it would take a weird miracle for anything to change. So when the wax lion starts talking to Jaye, and she listens, well, I bought it. Who hasn’t hoped for the universe to send them a sign?”

Happy 10th Anniversary, Wonderfalls! — Vulture (via huffellepuff)

johndarnielle:

you know what
I loved unicorns when I was eleven/twelve years old and then I learned that it was real soft and nerdy to love unicorns so I checked out of the whole unicorn-liking mindset because I felt a need to be hardening myself and copping a dark-stuff-only stance
then when I was 19 my girlfriend gave me a coffee cup with a unicorn on it and on receiving it I discovered that I had internalized some bullshit anti-unicorn stance and it made me sad
to those unicorns who didn’t get liked by me during my bullshit years: my bad, do you like carrots, I will leave a plate of carrots out by the back door, I also have oats

johndarnielle:

you know what

I loved unicorns when I was eleven/twelve years old and then I learned that it was real soft and nerdy to love unicorns so I checked out of the whole unicorn-liking mindset because I felt a need to be hardening myself and copping a dark-stuff-only stance

then when I was 19 my girlfriend gave me a coffee cup with a unicorn on it and on receiving it I discovered that I had internalized some bullshit anti-unicorn stance and it made me sad

to those unicorns who didn’t get liked by me during my bullshit years: my bad, do you like carrots, I will leave a plate of carrots out by the back door, I also have oats

twiststreet:


"It’s okay to have a sad life.  It’s okay.  The majority of people— the world spends all this time telling us when we’re young that we’re all special and gentle snowflakes.  Not true."
"Chris!"
"Some of us are just sad people— start sad, stay sad, and then you just got to roll with it and have fun in the face of it."
"I don’t want to be a sad person.  I want to be a special person."
"I did too for a very long time."

—  Advice to the young people from Chris Gethard while he’s getting a belly burrito made!

twiststreet:

"It’s okay to have a sad life.  It’s okay.  The majority of people— the world spends all this time telling us when we’re young that we’re all special and gentle snowflakes.  Not true."

"Chris!"

"Some of us are just sad people— start sad, stay sad, and then you just got to roll with it and have fun in the face of it."

"I don’t want to be a sad person.  I want to be a special person."

"I did too for a very long time."

—  Advice to the young people from Chris Gethard while he’s getting a belly burrito made!

annfriedman:

In the past few years we’ve seen more shows and movies featuring female fuckups, from Young Adult to Girls to Bachelorette. But usually, these women are embarrassed by their failure to get it together, and their insecurities spill over to poison their friendships and romantic relationships alike. By contrast, the women of Broad City exhibit very real imperfections without the self-loathing. This strikes me as a huge step forward. Abbi and Ilana don’t just reject the exacting standards most women feel they have to live up to, they still feel great about themselves. And their self-esteem is probably directly attributable to their unflinching support of each other and the pleasure they take in each other’s company.
The genius of Broad City - The Guardian

Word.

annfriedman:

In the past few years we’ve seen more shows and movies featuring female fuckups, from Young Adult to Girls to Bachelorette. But usually, these women are embarrassed by their failure to get it together, and their insecurities spill over to poison their friendships and romantic relationships alike. By contrast, the women of Broad City exhibit very real imperfections without the self-loathing. This strikes me as a huge step forward. Abbi and Ilana don’t just reject the exacting standards most women feel they have to live up to, they still feel great about themselves. And their self-esteem is probably directly attributable to their unflinching support of each other and the pleasure they take in each other’s company.

The genius of Broad City - The Guardian

Word.